Egyptian men and women used makeup to enhance their appearance. They were very fond of eyeliner and eye-shadows in dark colors including blue, red, and black. Ancient Sumerian men and women were possibly the first to invent and wear lipstick, about 5,000 years ago.[6] They crushed gemstones and used them to decorate their faces, mainly on the lips and around the eyes.[7] Also around 3000 BC to 1500 BC, women in the ancient Indus Valley Civilization applied red tinted lipstick to their lips for face decoration.[8] Ancient Egyptians extracted red dye from fucus-algin, 0.01% iodine, and some bromine mannite, but this dye resulted in serious illness. Lipsticks with shimmering effects were initially made using a pearlescent substance found in fish scales.[9] Six thousand year old relics of the hollowed out tombs of the Ancient Egyptian pharaohs are discovered.
Customer reviews are available on Beautycounter’s website. The Dew Skin Tinted Moisturizer gets 4.5 stars from more than 1600 reviews. Fans say “Love it! I don’t usually wear foundation, but I have worn this nonstop since receiving it. It just gives me an evenness that I love without feeling heavy or even rubbing off on my husband’s shirt! Plus, I am wearing sunscreen every day!” Those who aren’t love complained that it didn’t offer enough coverage. “This make up has almost no color or coverage. It would be better to use a good moisturizer and apply a less expensive makeup.”
I really wanted to like this product line. I love the simple elegance of product content and packaging, and as someone who works in natural healthcare I was hopeful I’d found “the answer” for my clients looking for clean, effective skin care. I purchased a starter kit for $289 that contained Day Cream, Night Cream, a cream cleanser, an exfoliating cleanser, three face oil combos (Hydrating, Soothing and Balancing) and eye cream. I also bought their Dew Skin Tinted Moisturizer. After the first couple of days, I realized my skin wouldn’t tolerate the Balancing and Soothing oils for some reason. They seemed to dry my skin out in a way I hadn’t experienced before, and to do the exact opposite of balance and soothe. No problem, I just stopped using them and figured not all their products can be right for everyone. I continued using the remaining products – including the Hydrating Oil – for about six weeks. By the end of the six weeks, my skin was extremely dry to the point of flaking AND I was starting to break out. My skin has always been on the dry side but never flaked and I’ve never had breakouts in my life. My skin was irritated and felt inflamed, and the final straw was waking one morning feeling as if I’d been sleeping all night in a clay mask – my skin actually felt and looked shriveled, desiccated. So now I’m in the process of trying to repair skin that is hyper-sensitive and constantly burning, flaking and dry and that appears dull and even kind of grey in places. To say I’m disappointed is an understatement. I AM, however, glad I tried these products out on my own skin before selling them to my friends, family and clients as I had considered. I was a little hesitant originally anyway because they seem very expensive, and now I know for certain there’s no way I can sell them after the experience I had.
Parenthetically, while I am on the subject, there are brands that I recommend that do not test their pigments for heavy metals. That’s not my standard, because in order to be conclusive, a manufacturer would have to test every new batch of all products they are making. This would be prohibitively expensive, and, to my knowledge, nobody does that. Instead, my standard is to require EcoCert certified mineral pigments that are NOT made in China due to their high levels of background pollution.
There are many others including talc, butylated compounds and petroleum, but let’s start slow. They’re used to both emulsify and extend the shelf-life of your beauty products, but they actually do more harm than good. So why are they included? Because they’re cheap and there’s very little regulation in the beauty industry. In fact no federal regulation regarding personal care products has been passed since 1938!
The prevailing eurocentric concept of beauty has varying effects on different cultures. Primarily, adherence to this standard among African American women has bred a lack of positive reification of African beauty, and philosopher Cornel West elaborates that, "much of black self-hatred and self-contempt has to do with the refusal of many black Americans to love their own black bodies-especially their black noses, hips, lips, and hair."[51] These insecurities can be traced back to global idealization of women with light skin, green or blue eyes, and long straight or wavy hair in magazines and media that starkly contrast with the natural features of African women.[52]
agreed. this is not a article but rather an opinion. not sharing their test results does not make them liars, that’s just silly. BC is doing more for the industry than any other company by advocating for regulation and laws for safer ingredients. This writer should be recognizing that and helping along the way by sharing her opinion and urging BC to listen rather than telling everyone to boycott it. So ridiculous.
Eyeshadow: Beautycounter’s Velvet palette in Romantic: Not to sound sensationalist, but I believe this is THE BEST eyeshadow in green beauty–it’s super pigmented, but natural colors, stays on ALL DAY (seriously!) and doesn’t crease! I also have their Necessary Neutrals palette and it comes with pretty much every eye shadow color you’d ever need, plus a dual-ended brush for easy application!
Some of you have made inquiries into what specific levels of heavy metals they have been finding in their products and have received no response.  Thus, it seems that at the very least they do not promise “under 2 ppm” per product or per heavy metal or per pigment anymore, neither on the website nor in private emails, which is an improvement.  And if you are a Beautycounter consultant, you should be grateful to those have made inquiries and made Beautycounter more transparent.

Cosmetic regulations in Europe are often updated to follow the trends of innovations and new technologies while ensuring product safety. For instance, all annexes of the Regulation 1223/2009 were aimed to address potential risks to human health. Under the EU cosmetic regulation, manufacturers, retailers, and importers of cosmetics in Europe will be designated as "Responsible Person".[74] This new status implies that the responsible person has the legal liability to ensure that the cosmetics and brands they manufacture or sell comply with the current cosmetic regulations and norms. The responsible person is also responsible of the documents contained in the Product Information File (PIF), a list of product information including data such as Cosmetic Product Safety Report, product description, GMP statement, or product function.


I really wanted to like this product line. I love the simple elegance of product content and packaging, and as someone who works in natural healthcare I was hopeful I’d found “the answer” for my clients looking for clean, effective skin care. I purchased a starter kit for $289 that contained Day Cream, Night Cream, a cream cleanser, an exfoliating cleanser, three face oil combos (Hydrating, Soothing and Balancing) and eye cream. I also bought their Dew Skin Tinted Moisturizer. After the first couple of days, I realized my skin wouldn’t tolerate the Balancing and Soothing oils for some reason. They seemed to dry my skin out in a way I hadn’t experienced before, and to do the exact opposite of balance and soothe. No problem, I just stopped using them and figured not all their products can be right for everyone. I continued using the remaining products – including the Hydrating Oil – for about six weeks. By the end of the six weeks, my skin was extremely dry to the point of flaking AND I was starting to break out. My skin has always been on the dry side but never flaked and I’ve never had breakouts in my life. My skin was irritated and felt inflamed, and the final straw was waking one morning feeling as if I’d been sleeping all night in a clay mask – my skin actually felt and looked shriveled, desiccated. So now I’m in the process of trying to repair skin that is hyper-sensitive and constantly burning, flaking and dry and that appears dull and even kind of grey in places. To say I’m disappointed is an understatement. I AM, however, glad I tried these products out on my own skin before selling them to my friends, family and clients as I had considered. I was a little hesitant originally anyway because they seem very expensive, and now I know for certain there’s no way I can sell them after the experience I had.

Their Never List™: Over 1,500 ingredients are NEVER used in their products, including over 1,400 chemicals banned or restricted in personal care products by the European Union, plus additional chemicals screened by Beautycounter and found to be of concern. This includes things like parabens, phthalates, oxybenzone, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and formaldehyde.

The experience of "beauty" often involves an interpretation of some entity as being in balance and harmony with nature, which may lead to feelings of attraction and emotional well-being. Because this can be a subjective experience, it is often said that "beauty is in the eye of the beholder."[1] Often, given the observation that empirical observations of things that are considered beautiful often align among groups in consensus, beauty has been stated to have levels of objectivity and partial subjectivity which are not fully subjective in their aesthetic judgement.
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